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Help needed: Grease build-up on bakeware?

Jessica emailed me with this question:

Do you have any tips for cleaning off the sticky yellow buildup (Pam spray, oil, etc.) that accumulates on the handles and edges of glass bakeware? Soap and scrubbing isn't doing the job for me, and I hate that I can't seem to get my glass baking dishes really clean.

I have found that steel wool scrubbing pads (like Brillo or SOS) will take the baked oil off of glass bakeware, but that solution won't work for something non-stick. I also prefer not to use steel wool on my stainless steel bakeware since it does scratch the surface as it cleans.

My solution has just been to grease my baking dishes with butter (you can use shortening, also) instead of using vegetable oils or sprays. It's a little extra bother, but won't leave brown grease spots on your pans afterwards. :)

I've also noticed that some frozen foods (like tater tots) will leave build-up on pans. So, for the rare occasion that we eat something frozen that's greasy, I have one particular baking sheet that I use. It's non-stick, and I'll probably never get that grease off of it without damaging the surface...

Does anyone have any good tips for cleaning baked-on oil off of different kinds of bakeware? Please share!! :)

Comments

Tammy's picture

Grease build-up -- comments

Build up grease
Submitted by Martha Artyomenko
I use a metal scrubbie. It gets off alot of it with a little scrubbing, but I have no trouble with my glass pans.

Don't use the vegetable sprays!
Submitted by Jules
I just line everything w/aluminum foil or parchment paper. I use parchment paper when baking. And I only use Reyonald's Aluminum foil, the release stuff, not the regular aluminum foil. I've been lining pans/cookie sheets w/alum foil for probably 20 yrs.

I haven't come across needing to use those sprays yet.

Me! Me! Me! I know this one!
Submitted by Anonymous
If you use liquid dishwasher (not dishwashING)detergent as a paste and let it sit a bit, or if the problem is burned on inside of the pan, add about 2 tb to a quart of water and let soak. YOU will be amazed.
Borax sometimes works too.
Another thing I love about dishwasher soap is that is also works like a clorox pen. It is a paste bleach, good for getting out a spot stain.
Hope that helps,
Amy

Baking Soda!
Submitted by Anonymous
It's just abrasive enough to clean the gunk off without scratching glass. My glass pans and Corningware look *brand new* and I have no idea how old they are. (I've been married 33 years and can't remember when those things were purchased.)

Sprinkle a generous amount of baking soda in a dry spot (counter or clean dish or sink). Dab a damp cloth in the baking soda and scrub away.

An even easier thing to clean with is the creme stuff that is especially made for glass cooktops. It's just more expensive, of course, and most of us have baking soda available. The cooktop cleaner definitely takes less elbow grease, though.

Shortening
Submitted by Kathleen B.
Our family greases with shortening and we don't have a problem with build-up. Cleaning-wise, I'd try some of the things mentioned here to do a good cleaning of your bakeware, then once they're clean, just giving them a scrub-down with those non-metal scouring pads each time you use them.

Kathleen

Submitted by Anonymous
When mine gets too built up, I spray oven cleaner on it and let it sit overnight. Are we talking glass???

I Agree with the Vote for Baking Soda
Submitted by foxxyroxie
I used baking soda too.... use it for everything that needs a boost that regular cleaner can't handle without hauling out the heavy artillary. I keep a box right by the dish detergent for convenience.

Submitted by Anonymous
In a pinch I have used those magic erasers to get the yuck off the edges, just be sure to wash thoroughly before using them!

another product that works great is...
Submitted by Anonymous
I use the product Bar Keepers Friend on all my clear glass pans and white corning wear dishes when they get the stains you are talking about. (It works great for fiberglass shower doors too.) They have a web site....www.barkeepersfriend.com...where you can look at their product info. It gets stainless steel and aluminum pots really clean too.

Deb

I don't think I saw it suggested above
Submitted by Anonymous
But you might also want to try soaking them in vinegar for a while (more than an hour, better if overnight). It helps loosen up the gunk when you scrub it.

Mercedes @ Common Sense with Money

Thumbs Up to the Baking Soda!
Submitted by honeymom
Yes, another vote for Baking Soda! It's inexpensive and non-toxic too. Just remember to rinse really well after using it and your metal or glass bakewear should sparkle!!! It's also great for scrubbing the sink after all the messy baking dishes are washed :)

grease build-up on dishes

I use baking soda, too. It's great. For the really hard cases ammonia does the trick.

Baking Soda is awsome

I just tried the baking soda recommendation, and all I can say is WOW! It worked like a charm. Thanks for the advice.

won't use shortening

Going to try the baking soda. I won't use the shorting because of the trans fats. They are difficult for the body to get rid of, so they tend to be accumulative. I much prefer avoiding them whenever I can since when eating out, you can't.

The Baking soda worked!

YAY! Thanks so much! they are so clear now! I am so thrilled....10 years off my dishes!

Kosher Salt

I have successfully used large-grain Kosher salt to clean such items. However this works because it is abrasive, I think, so it may also scratch your pans. I'm at the point where I don't care if they get a little scratched; I just want that gunk off!

This baking soda thing is amazing!

I just tried it and I can't believe how great it works! I can't believe I've been just tolerating the buildup of grease for so long. Thank you so much!

BAKING SODA & LIQUID DISHWASHER DETERGENT

I read all the review and I was using Liquid Dishwasher Detergent (The one u use for Dishwasher) before I read this review and it lift up all the dark big hard to scrub grease off but still had a hard time scrubbing the small lil brown grease so i put some baking soda and it did a wonders. BOTH product works well but together works great too ^^ THANK YOU

Baking soda worked like a charm

My clear glassware had gunk that had been baked on it for years. It took some elbow grease but the baking soda did the trick. What a difference!

Automatic Dishwasher Gel

I scrubbed all day - with no luck... - and then tried the Dishwasher gel mentioned here. I had a non-stick surface so I was afraid to use some of these abrasive recommendations. The GEL worked like a charm - let it sit, then used a non-abrasive (blue) sponge, scrubbed a little and it came right off...THANK YOU all for the advice.

WD40

No joke. Spray a little WD40 on it, let it sit a minute or two, and rub it off with a paper towel. You'll see the brown goo on the paper towel. Naturally, you need to wash the pan, either in the dishwasher or with soap and water. Just a side note - WD40 on a paper towel will get that sticky residue left by price tags off, too. I use it on my paperback books.

For well burned on stuff

For well burned on stuff inside the pan, put a generous handful of baking soda in, 1/2 inch of clear white vinegar and boil for a while. When you boil the vinegar out, add another 1/2 inch of vinegar and boil some more. Let it cool and the baking soda will have dried out and the burned stuff just flakes off with the baking soda and then rinses out. Kind of miraculous . . .
Guess how I figured out? First I burned some stuff to my pan (I am the queen of burning chicken tortilla soup or chilli . . . ), then I did a recommended baking soda/vinegar soak and then I forgot about it simmer til the vinegar had boiled dry . . . so I added more and did it again and when I cleaned it out all the burned chili rinsed out!! I have had occasion to do this many more times . . .

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